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privacy laws and we need to update those laws. the last time the electronics communications privacy act was updated was in 1986 and a lot has changed since then. >> host: grover norquist what kind of access to law enforcement officials in the government have to our e-mails today? >> guest: right now it's not treated as if it's regular mail, snail mail. they can go into it as a third-party and put it up on the cloud. what we need to do is update the law to go alongside the changes in technologies that are sending each other letters. we send each other e-mails instead of keeping europe letter in your pocket you may stored in the cloud somewhere and that's should have the same privacy that you regular snail mail does in the post office delivering something and if we can do that. we have updated this from time to time, the technology changes. the technology has been changing quicker but to send someone an e-mail is like sending them a letter. it's the same thing. the fourth amendment is still there. >> host: also joining our roundtable today is -- of the hill newspaper. >> my first question
second amendment rights and the second amendment rights of our law-abiding law-ag citizens. we have seen the newtown parents here in washington bravely telling their stories. they deserve better than this body turning their backs on them. the families of aurora deserve better than this body turning their backs on them. the families of more than 30 people who die every single day at the hands of gun violence deserve more from this body. my friends, it is simply time to act. today is the day for this body to show the american people that their voices matter. that when 90% of americans demand us to expand background checks, that we can deliver. we should be able to agree today that we no longer need military-style weapons and ammunition clips on our streets. and we should be able to agree today that it's time to crack down on the illegal handguns being trafficked in our streets into the hands of criminals. four years ago, i met the parents of naisha pryor yard. naisha was a beautiful 17-year-old honor student killed in the prime of her life by an illegal handgun when she was just spending t
and use tax laws and for other purposes. mr. reid: mr. president, i would object to any further proceedings in regard to this bill. the presiding officer: objection having been heard, the bill will be placed on the calendar. mr. reid: mr. president, today this august body will honor the memory of 20 first-grade children, little babies who were gunned down, most of them shot multiple times. we will also honor the teachers and administrators who were killed that day in newtown, connecticut. but we're also going to honor with this legislation tens of thousands of others who were killed by guns each year here in america. we're going to do that by voting on a number of measures to strengthen the laws to prevent gun violence in this nation. mr. president, the families of innocents killed in newtown, aurora, in carson city, blacksburg, in oak creek and columbine really deserve these votes. where do i stand on these democratic proposals? this afternoon the senate will vote on a compromised background check proposal crafted by senators manchin, toomey, kirk and schumer, all experienced l
of these companies. the bureau can now follow whether laws are being followed from credit origination to debt collection, by identifying problems and rooting them out early we're working to try to minimize consumer harm. our report also encompasses the bureau's first enforcement actions against credit card companies that deceived consumers inch some cases the companies targeted economically vulnerable consumers with low credit scores and low credit limits. we were able to secure $425 million in relief for six million consumers and imposed penalties on the company to deter such activity in the future. these actions will senior as a warning signal for anyone who seeks to profit by misleading consumers inch the second half of 2012 we tackled issues in the market for private student loan debt which currently totals $150 billion outstanding. the studies detail the struggles students and recent graduates are experiencing. together with the education secretary we made recommendations to congress on common sense reform to ensure the risky underwriting practices of the past are not repeated. the work
why now? i want to share a few things. one is that once we start implementing the law and the mechanisms started falling in place and in the first year we got 1,000 cases nudged and then results. .. the mechanism is one thing. the greeting that oxygen, the way we can breed of the greeting as space for rigging a plan and not be bastrop away. women who complain, stigma and retaliation. that is the part that probably would need to focus on. the other thing i felt was that it was really a universal issue. i, during my struggle in the last ten years, have probably read about every sexual-harassment case. and every country, i went to japan a month ago and there it was everywhere in the public place and offices. so i felt like this is something that we really need to a not divide up the world, and this is the part where women have problems and this is a part of the world that has the outcome. we will need to develop a bond of solidarity. when need to talk about our struggles. countries like pakistan, one case of a gang rape or something happens and then it goes into the media
law enforcement and the courts, immigration, intellectual property, and even the senior and other programs whose fiscal outlook threatens our future solvency and very survival. once we clear on a central policy from the books federal politicians will no longer be able to hide from the public or from their constitutional responsibilities and limitations. congress will be forced to work together to reform the problems government has greater and our health care system. we can reform and modernize of regulatory system. we will be forced to rescue our senior endowment programs in bankruptcy, and we can reform our tax system to eliminate the corporate codes, in favor of big businesses over small businesses, and individual codes of bias against saving, investing and especially against our parents, our ultimate investor class. that is how we turn the federal government unsustainable liabilities into sustainable assets. the bottom line of all of it is that controversies in that building over there, the really big white one with the dome, need to start doing what conservatives in this build
. >> good evening. i'm the director of the yale law library and i'm here to welcome you to the library booktalk sister i want to thank the founders society for cosponsoring tonight's talk. tonight's program features logan beirne who is the author of a new book on america's first chief executive entitled "blood of tyrants: george washington and the forging of the presidency." this is very much a yale law school block. it began as a paper while logan was a law school student. the paper was written -- after graduation from law school in 2008 and working two years in a law firm, logan returned to yale law school in 2010 as a scholar and began turning the paper into the book that we feature tonight. appropriate laid we have the professor with those to comment on the book. professor is a highly distinguished member of the yale law school factoid. is the author of numerous books, monographs and articles, and several of his books have been featured in previous book club series sponsored by our library. according to a recently published study by my colleague, fred sugar, professor eskridge is
. ratified by the senate or the law of the land. and it sounds to me like one of the punchlines of your account, even though washington powers did grow, he did have a republican understanding, which required him to be very attentive to the commitments that were made by the nation. in the 1770s, we were not in position to make international commitments, but we did it with didn't have a lot of statutes on the book, but we have resolutions. would you not say when it washingtons experiences the commander-in-chief has a constitutional obligation to take seriously the commitment the nation has made in conventions like the geneva convention. .. >> i think it's important for the commander-in-chief to be looking at commitments that we make. >> others? more questions? speeches? opinions about canada? [laughter] >> [inaudible]. >> the former dean wants to make a speech about her youth. [laughter] >> i spent many summers canoeing in canada and singing every morning oh, candidate, which is beautiful. for that reason i made a point in junior high school of studying the history of canada, and why i ha
tragedy to a law office in san francisco in 1993. where a crazed gunman -- i remember his name but i won't say it -- with an assault weapon killed eight people and wounded six. one of those people was a brave warrior who threw his body over the body of his wife, sacrificing his own life to save hers. now, that young man was one of my son's best friends, and i know personally how these horrific and senseless tragedies live on with the survivors. the parents, the spouses, the children, the family and the friends. it changes their lives and it pierces their hearts forever. so i've told you a couple of stories about california, but let me say this. let's look at what's happened across this nation since sandy hook. in the 120 days since sandy hook, more than 2,200 americans have been killed by gun violence. hardly anyplace was spared. now, we know there are many, many firearms in america. 300 million firearms in the united states. if you were to divide that up, that would be one gun per person. of course, there are many people who just have many, many guns. now, this is a 50% increase in the
with our government's top national security priority, which is the lawful effective and humane interrogation of this subject for the purposes of gathering intelligence. the boston attacks were clearly inspired by the violent ideology of transnationallist islamist terrorism. so we need to learn everything we can about what foreign terrorists or terrorist groups the suspect and his brother might have associated with, whether they were part of additional plots to attack our nation, and what other relevant information the suspect may possess that could prevent future attacks against the united states or our interests. i think we need to delve further into this whole issue of the education that some people who are motivated by these base ideologies obtain over the internet and the effect that it's having. we should at least know about that. our civilian justice system offers a responsible option for striking this balance with american citizens. it allows the justice department to delay reading a suspect his miranda rights if doing so is in the interest of -- quote -- "public safety.
. >> recognized experts in law, medicine and ethics. the group includes conservatives and liberals, republicans and democrats. and you can find her biographical information in the press kit and in the report itself. the constitution project is enormously grateful to the members of the task force for their diligence, dedication, time and courage. they all contribute a remarkable expertise and stake their considerable personal and professional reputation to produce this report. i also want to thank the staff that guided the task force, which was extraordinarily diligent, meticulous, and hard-working. the american public owes both the task force members and the staff a debt of gratitude. eight a the 11th of the task force are here today, as is neil lewis, the task force's wonderful executive director. i'm pleased to introduce one of the groups co-chairs, ambassador james jones will begin the presentation. thank you. >> thank you very much for the introduction. let me first say that personally and on behalf of the task force members, i want to express our sympathy and our solidarity with the people
any new laws. we're creating about uniforming the laws we have. get of all we have on the book today, a federal firms licensed dealer. there's approximately 55,000 throughout the united states of america. so we all have one close to us or in our neighborhood. these are friends of mine. people i know. if you good to a lioned -- licensed dole dealer today and purchase a gun, you're required to do a background check, criminal background check, and you're basically checked to see if you are able to have a gun. that licensed dealer puts that record of the background check they did, and he or she only can keep it. it's against the law to form some type of registry so the paranoia where people say someone will know where my guns are, that can't happen. in our bill we double-down to make sure that doesn't happen by making at it felony with 15 year imprisonment. so all that myth is gone. the second way you buy a gun is at a gun show. if you go to a gun show today, and that same dealer, licensed dealer, if you went to their store you go through the background check. if you go to the gun show,
by tennessee law. and if you don't, well then you don't have to do business in tennessee. it's just that simple and fair. in terms of imposing a new tax, this bill does not create one new tax. first, there are no federal taxes in here, none. and second, we don't even have the power to impose a new state tax, a state sales tax, nor would we try. no new taxes. simply a question of compliance and collecting the taxes already owed in the 46 states that currently have sales and use taxes. i urge my colleagues to come forward tonight at 5:30, vote for cloture on the motion to proceed. let us engage in this important debate. let us not put this off another day, another week, another month. let's bring this to a conclusion in the senate with a good, wholesome debate on a bipartisan basis, germane, relevant, constructive amendments that address some of the issues are welcome. bring them forward and let's not burn up the hours of the day and the hours of the week in quorum calls but let's get down to the business of the senate we were sent to do. i yield the floor. a senator: mr. president? the presiding
control act? wouldn't it be appropriate for us to know what measures have to be taken in case existing law continues to prevail? >> we are -- yes, it is. we do. for example, i noted in my testimony we will be coming up to the congress a significant package of reprogramming request, which we have worked with the congress on. >> it's one thing to have reprogramming request. it's another thing to submit a budget, overall bijt that reflects the reality of the law as it is today rather than sending us a budget that has restoration of cuts that so far there's been no movement or action to rerepeal. i think we need to know what happens if we don't repeal. it's in your interest, in my view, to give us that information as to what would happen if we just simply comply with existing law. >> well, i want to address both the points. one, we are continuing to do that, senator. and as part of marty's testimony, part of my testimony on what we are doing and explaining working with committees here in the house and the senate on we continue -- don't make the change what will be requested. for example, suppl
. they now expect more than 40 percent of the claims to be back law during either of these two years. so in revising these projections what matters did you look at and what did they -- what additional you? >> i looked at the actual submissions of receipts of claims that we have received from our veterans of the last five months. each month they have been lowered and are expected volume. >> the math works out to where you would have only a 40% backlog situation. >> no, it doesn't. i don't think that you all would throw me out of here if i said that that would happen. is now where we are. we are at about 69 percent of our plans right now that our older than 125 days, working every single day to drive that never south. we're doing it to focus on how people process technology solutions. as far as we can pushing a productivity by folks from i can tell you today that 70 percent more effective and higher productivity than they were prior to us moving into this transformation plan. >> last year he testified that during 2013 the backlog would be reduced from 60% to 40%, and that would -- and ' --
, a bill to restore states' sovereign rights to enforce state and local sales and use tax laws, and for other purposes. mr. reid: i ask for a second reading and object to my own request. the presiding officer: objection having been heard, the bill will be read for a second time on the next legislative day. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent the senate recess subject to the call of the chair. the presiding officer: without objection, the senate stands in recess subject to the call of the chair. >>> one day after the boston bombings a bipartisan watch group said the government used torture and illegal interrogation methods after the september 11 attacks in 2001. that report is next on c-span2. >>> she came into the white house, she was a 47-year-old lady that he did politics. she was deeply depressed at the death of her son and especially under the terrible circumstances in which she died. she didn't have many friends unfortunately, but she did have a wonderful family there always seems to be somebody there and i don't think he did very much but she was a very intellectual woman,
and services and law firm income. if you want to encourage small business, we can work together. >> we cannot merthyr posted the code to try and alleviate pressure of taxes, but instead of having loopholes, why don't we have the raise? that way they decide for themselves what to do with capital, how to create jobs. there is where going to have an issue when it comes to tax reform. i don't want it well on this because i'm putting myself on the clock so we can get to everybody else here. has the president made any proposals since he's been president to raise taxes on families earning less than $200,000 for $250,000 for joint filers? >> the pledges prison and a pledge that it will not hit 50 below 250. another's disagreements on categorizing, but i'd be happy to have the conversation. >> i'm just trying to save the supreme court says the mandate is a task that obviously has everybody. including people making less than $250,000. the cigarette tax, smokers don't just make about $250,000. but the new 28% tax rate limitation on deductions kicks in families making $220,000. the point is your already
. let me assure you the subcommittee is ready to help in any way we can to help law enforcement against perpetrators and planners of this act of terror and insure ensure the full force of justice is -- to think something like that taking place anything this committee do we stand ready. i want to express disappointment with regard to you and me in the subcommittee. in somecas has not takimportantm disappointed that the depant bee authities the committee to expand federal prison -- it has fallen from 23,000 in 2006 to 12,800 in fy14. this is an area where leadership is necessary and we have made it very clear that i want to support you in this effort that we need to see to take it seriously in an energetic way and we have not seen it. why can't that picture with the entire federal government and why can't the ncaa -- from prisons. you can put a man or woman in prison for 50 years and give them no work and no dignity. this will not displace american jobs but a proven way to end recidivism to make progress. i am also dissatisfied and disappointed with a noncommittal response to my suggestio
--from personal grievance to public law". the book describes what happened when 11 women joined the campaign to go into the un only to be attacked by there un managers. the case culminated in legislation by the pakistani parliament in 2000 that make sexual harassment crime. she is the chair person, and human rights and democracy streaming and research on news activism and environment. and based in washington d.c. at the national endowment for democracy. and over red light areas, released by oxford and forgotten cases. and in japanese have become popular among young pakistani women. and the doctorate working at the university of minnesota. please join in welcoming today's guest dr. fouzia saeed. [applause] >> very nice to be here and i look forward to the next hour of engagement with you. if you want to turn this off you can, at least up to the limit. i am going to tell you a story today and the stories in the context of pakistan, about one woman and also celebration of women in pakistan but it resonates universally, goes across borders. this is about a legislation we got in pakistan against sexual
background is in the law and, actually, he began his background in law at his family's kitchen table. his father, rex lee, was a law school dean, assistant u.s. attorney general and solicitor general for ronald reagan. senator lee is a graduate of brigham young university and byu law school, was a law clerk for judge dean benson of the u.s. district court of the district of utah and then judge sam alito's clerk when he was at the u.s. court of appeals for the 3rd circuit. he served as an attorney -- assistant u.s. attorney general in utah and general counsel to the governor of utah before turning to private practice. and then in 2010, that important election year, he decided to run united yorking out an -- knocking out an incumbent u.s. senator and a party-endorsed candidate to become the primary candidate and win the general election. senator lee is now on the judiciary committee, serves as ranking member of the antitrust competition policy and consumer rights subcommittee. he also sevens on the armed service -- serves on the armed services committee and the joint economic committee and
,ming. mr. presiden this amendment protects the privacy and sety of law-abiding gun owners. when government officials release gun ownership information it puts many lives at risk. this includes the lives of lawful gun owners, the lived of law enforcement and the lives of ctheic violence. state or local governments that release private gun owner information will be penalized 5% of their federal program funding. this includes the release of private information on individuals 0 who have licenses to purchase or who possess or who carry firearms. the funding that's withheld will then be redistributed to the states that are in compliance. this amendment will ensure that gun owners across the nation do not have their private gun owner information publicly released. thank you, mr. president. and i urge all my colleagues to support the amendment. mr. leahy: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from vermont. mr. leahy: this is a case of washington being big brother and telling each one of the states whether it's wyoming, vermont, or connecticut here's what you have to do. we have no idea
process of the law and end up killing more people than the so-called bad guys. >> ambassador akbar ahmed is a professor of studies. american university for noesseni fellow with the brookings institution, a viti professor formerly served as pakistan high customer to the u.k. and the author of several books. professor come on you the member of a tribe from your country as pakistan? >> guest: >> that is an interesting question. i have a question as an anthropologist it is critical to put out there for the reader so everyone knows. my mother is a baton, my father goes back to the profit in islam and i've always found the two are very interesting in my makeup comes along the one hand there is the person who would want peace and create good will and bring people together and compassion more thoughtful and even more mystical. and sometimes these are conflict and i see this in me. so i found that when i was doing the study i was able to get under the skin of the tribal people because that is also part of my heritage but i could reach beyond that and transcend that to reach out and find ways of b
to the logs and find out? to because they gather one. @booktv gather every one of the law books, all the organ's locks and everything to do with these are plants that night get shipped over to the command ship where there are meeting to cover up the story . they did away with it. that's why you haven't. and, in fact, to put the fear of god and the people who kept copies because they felt guilty, one of the chiefs actually kept a copy of what the fire that night, whenever. he would not turn it over because he still is so afraid of what might happen to him if he turns it over and if i were to get your someone were to get in and talk about it. as long as you d'tell anybody who they are taught all of this led turns out he was never notified. i went to see him. he was a reservist and. he lived in virginia. i drove out there to see him and talk to him and show them what i had. he slammed his fist down on the table and says, i have sas teams here and here and here. we put people in here. the helicopter ser. you know, so they could get to these guys of the went down because they expected a lot more of
of an of of the military is doing something that is violative of the law, on the military side as opposed to the civilian side. >> okay. i want to also make you, bring you back to homeland committee oversight subcommittee that held an investigatory hearing last year that concluded that the fbi's failure, refusal to tell the army about hasan's al qaeda connection led to the fort hood terror attacks. in the audience today, i just want to recognize our sergeant shawn mullins who still has two of hasan's bullets in his body, and sergeant alonzo who hasan shot six times, as well as one of the widows of major nidal hasan act that day. to twant to apologize on behalf of the government for failing you, and the president said when he met t you would be taken care of. and whether or not we get to the bottom of is this an act of workplace violence or an act of terror, and whether not you are owed your purple heart, just like the people that were killed in the pentagon on 9/11 or not, so that you can be properly treated, is something that i'm going to commit myself to pick and another for chairman will as well which
a budget at the reality is that the law as it is today rather than sending a budget that has restoration of cats that go far has been no movement or reaction to repeal. we need to know what happens if we don't repeal. it's in their interest to give the information that we just simply comply with existing law. >> we are continuing to do that, senator is part of marty's testimony, part of my testimony on what we are doing explaining working with the committees here in the house and senate what's going to be requested. for example, supplemental curb reissues. is that within the realm of what's going to be required? we don't know. i would add on the budget in one of the points made to smyrna nonmanaged, the senate and house budget resolutions for defend, essentially with basically the same numbers as our budget. not at all dismissing your questions that are real and legitimate under reality. as you know as well as anyone, this a $600 billion enterprise. this was put together of a series of the year and to readjust that and come back with new members in the budget. we are dealing with the rea
't reflect the law? secretary hagel? >> the fy15 budget we'll present earl next year will reflect the reality of whatever the situation is. i don't know if between now and next february if they worked hair on it, both parties, president has. >> that's why we're surprised when it didn't reflect this time around, but happy to hear it reflects the law of the land next time around. you know, last month, the addition of 15 additional intercepters will be deployed to alaska as reaction to the provocations we've had from north korea. this brings the numbers of alaska to the number of originally planned during the bush administration, i believe, later we deuced by president obama. i have a question to you about this. was the russian government consulted or informed that the united states was considering this decision before the decision was made, and if so, when did that occur? >> the answer is not to my knowledge. it was not russian government who was not consulted in any way, and it was not that decision, that policy was not decided based on any consideration of the russian government. incidentally
federal laws about desecrating national parks. and something else which was startling to me at first. i did not know what the grapes for trying to tell me a first. and what i realized and will allow the people who come and go up to the top of cadillac mountain and look out over what is essentially a big spruce forest did not realize is that the grapes were there before the spruce forest. and if you go back to the history, you find that. by about the year 1880, more than half of the island had been deforested. and along the edges any place that could grow hay or any kind of crops in the short growing season was used to create food for draft animals and food for people. and i realized that there were some enormous changes in the land that had not really thought about. and then i happened to stumble upon william cronin's book by the same name, changes in the land. when i came back from asia in the 80's i went back to michigan, where i grew up. i -- having this in mind, i saw these enormous changes in the landscape or grow. it was full of small family flowers in those days but no in the 80'
of not enforcing the law against small transactions so you think about it being legal in the front door of a coffee shop. but it's still illegal to produce and to sell the marijuana to those coffee shops so it's actually illegal. so what that does is it in place the price. so where was passed in washington and colorado it would allow for-profit companies to come produce and it's very different. it's just very different from other terms that gets thrown around like decriminalization. a lot of people use legalization and decriminalization interchangeably in that's incorrect. that just means lowering the penalties for possession, taking it from being a misdemeanor to a citation. when people talk about decriminalization that has nothing to do with production and distribution. that is why legalization and what happened in colorado and washington is so significant. >> host: what does it cost government, the federal government to having marijuana be illegal, enforcement and incarceration? >> guest: that's a great question. i don't know what it is for the federal government at some of the research we did i
. rowan law required it, especially deformed infants. so you see t mor trsfati of the west in accordance with the clippity. whether you're christian or not, you can say, i see this happening. certain things now are held to be bad that before people were indifferent or thought were good. and then beginning in the early 1500's, but by the 1900's and the 20th century, the sort of arc of christianity starts to descend, and as we have increasing secularization of the west, that coincides with the rise of liberalism, because they really are in many ways, if not all ways, the same thing. and you see the same moral issues that you -- you s a clash in the christian moral world view and liberalism. liberalism generally takes the side of things affirmed in the roman empire. so this is -- i can see the trajectory. you ll see s transformation, which would look like a great arc. christianity transforms the west, secondarrization improves it. so that's howl i understand that liberalism has been established as a world view. isn't jut through the supreme court or congress or education. but there's a grea
congress intent on i believe contrary to law. so i would just ask if you would personally review this ofhis regulation and make an independent judgment as secretary as to whetr you to tkelas pediatricright cyth dental. >> center, -- senator, i will commit to do that. i know that concerns have been raised about what is a proposed regulation, the comment. is still much -- very much still open so this is not a subtle form of going forward, but i hear your concerns. we have heard them from a number of people and i will commit to taking a personal look at exactly what the impacts will be on the very families who want to serve. >> thank you. i appreciate that. >> senator thune. >> thank you, mr. chairman, and madam secretary, welcome back to committee. thank you for being here. i have worked with several of my colleagues on this committee on a white paper which we issued yesterday, and it outlines concerns that we have about the electronic health record program which was created by the stevens bill and one of the chief concerns is the program wasn't thoughtfully planned and that cms and the offi
and decisions, which obviously affect complying with the law of the land if we have to. >> if i may follow-up, do you have an intention for a timetable for when the department would get back to the committee on it intension and plan for complying? >> i have to look at the review the deputy secretary of defense, chairman of the joint chiefs are leading and preceded on that basis. i don't want an expectation that isn't correct. that's why want to make sure i understand what is expected. as to your questions about overseas and other adamant however and the observation about assessing what you have to do to comply with these new realities. yes his affairs. we have been consolidating and closing facilities overseas the last few years. we'll have a study complete at the end of this year, specific way on additional recommendations of consolidating overseas. should be i agree. i think the leadership, dod donate to the terror infrastructure in this country as well. >> can i just had a couple of facts? there's about 30 more scheduled over the next 30 years in addition to the consolidation. we've bee
, elected official, law enforcement, they really present us with a set of complex questions. and above all, though, i have to repeat that the justice department, our federal united states department of justice, has the responsibility to enforce the controlled substances act. and that remains unchanged. to -- no state, no executive can nullify a statute that's been passed by congress. as the department of justice has noted, though, federal drug enforcement resources -- just like i did as a police chief -- we prioritize and target the serious crimes. serious crimes of drug dealing, violent crime and trafficking. and let's be clear that law enforcement officials take an oath of office to uphold federal law, and they're going to continue to pursue drug traffickers and drug dealers and transnational criminal organizations, all of which weaken our communities, and they pose very serious threats to our nation. and too often discussions about marijuana, though, dwell on this issue of legalization and whether making the drug more widely and easily available -- which it would be when it becomes lega
of the sequester and it's important to emphasize it is not a one-year proposition is writt into law to continue. given a list of fat and the woulit be fair to say then, riouses security risk basedt right now? >> it certainly is consuming a company intelligence community leadership for what we see happening to the capability and importantly the expectations people seem to have for our having this global insight and that is going to be very hard. if we sustain sequestration through 2021, what the law calls for, as i said in my testimony to the senate in telogen's community and a day before, we collectively have to rethink what people expect from the intelligence community because it isn't going to be the same. >> general flynn. >> i just want to emphasize is a senior leader, just to reemphasize the general clapper talked about, we are about people and we do not want to damage that vital component of our capability. the sequestration provides is no flexibility. not just this year, but over the long haul. our adversaries won't take a strategic pause and the real cost director clapper highlightedvwe
. neither was infanticide. in fact, the roman law mandated it of especially deformed infants. infants would be left out, taken up into slavery or just die. so you see the moral transformation of the west in accordance with christianity. whether you're christian or not, you can say, yeah, i see this happening. certain things now are held to be bad that before, people that were indifferent about or thought was good. and then beginning -- well, actually, i argue beginning in the early 1500s but certainly by the 1900s and the 20th century, the sort of arc of christianity starts to descend s and as we have increasing secularization of the west, that coip sides with the rise of liberalism because they really are, in many ways if not all ways, the same thing. and you see the same moral issues, you see a clash between the christian moral world view and liberalism. and liberalism generally takes the side of the kind of things that were affirmed in the roman empire. so just as an historian of ethics, i can see that. not even have to take sides, you still see the same ethical transformation historical
'm actually concerned about that. [inaudible] just something broke yesterday. john kerry's son-in-law, which didn't come out in the vetting process, his son-in-law is an iranian. and iranian americans with very close world is in iran. and that is, it's a breakdown of the vetting process. and so i will ask you all, are you concerned about this? >> i would have to know more about the iranians. most iranian americans of course our strong opponents of every regime i don't know about this person. >> [inaudible] >> this could be a problem, to come in terms of pressure and blackmail. i would be concerned about that, you know. i would say if the state department is now aware of that fact, they may be able to take steps to protect him in some way or put him in some of the portfolio. but i don't know about the situation. >> since we are losing some media coverage, i just want to reiterate that there's a book called "persecuted: the global assault on christians." three of the three authors are here on this panel. we are grateful for your time. also, new website, persecutionreport.org. please don't neg
issued a proclamation which declared in effect marshall law for the county of princes and, required all of this history wear red ribbons to show their loyalty for the mother company. the first house of worship actually was the old courthouse building, but that was acquired in the 1820s, and it served for almost 100 years a. across the street from us is a church which was organized in 1843, portion of the old sanctuary survived a 1940s fire, and, therefore, it is the oldest house of worship here in this area. the city of virginia beach as we noted consist of 310 square miles until relatively recently, very rural, in the beginning of the wicked are only 19,000 people in all of the modern city of 440,000. and so the historic buildings that we have going back to hundred, 250, 300 years are really very scattered. today, virginia beach is known to many people because of the resort and the oceanfront. that was impossible really in the 1880s when the rail line was constructed from norfolk to the oceanfront. there are several buildings at the oceanfront which reflect the early years of the virgi
in for a long time. the law requires that. beyond that we don't know for sure. we have had difficult negotiations over the second part that have the guest worker program and make sure that it's both at will and contract so it serves all of agricultural. because we know at some point we need additional workers beyond the highly trained skilled workers that are currently doing the work in the country that are likely to get a blue card. there will be additional workers needed down the road. we have to a viable worker program. the current program is not that program. if we have the blue card program in our existing h2a we would be back here in a few years, senator, telling you we have a big problem. >> my time is . >> that's what we've got avoid. we have to make sure we don't make the same mistake as 1986. >> thank you. we have two unique situations on the committee, as we mentioned with senator cornyn who had to be absent and all of us understand why. there's no question he should have been in texas and was. the other senator feinstein who is handled the ag negotiations. both will be gi
, led negotiations for the reimplication of east east germ. he is proficient in economics of law, a doctor of law, and he's written a number of books most recently "the future of modernization: what we can learn from the crisis," and, mr. minister, delighted you with are us, look forward to the remarks, and we'll then pepper you with questions. >> thank you very much. sorry for being late, tday,r thout and minds are on the people in boston. we hope it will be over soon. i have to make some remarks, and in europe, and what i wanted to say, we are the member -- [inaudible] we all know the summit in london , up to the meeting today, and we have made a lot of progress. we agree. [inaudible] too much in the european markets,. it is three main issues we are working on. i think in the open markets, we made last couple years, and that is not. in liberty, finance, and marks, we have a different opinion. aits issue as of late. we have to continue in this country. what we've done in europe, and bond markets, banking. [inaudible] financial markets and it is a very -- [inaudible] everyone at
of prosperity and of nations living by rule of law and of nation's living in peace. countries where strong human rights prevail our countries where people do better, economies thrive, rule of law is stronger, governments are more effective and more responsive, and they are countries that lead on the world stage and project stability across their regions. strong respect for human rights isn't merely an indicator that a country is likely doing well. it actually unleashes a countries potential, and it helps to advance growth and progress. so i ask you just to think of the country like burma for a minute. because of steps towards democratic reform and stronger human rights protections, a country that had been isolated for years is now making progress. as it reached where we wanted to be? know, but it's on the road. it's moving. and more people are contributed economy and participating in the government, leading toasr growth andnt. and by starting to embrace universal rights, the burmese government has opened the doors to a stronger partnership with their neighborhood and with countries around the wo
sometime in the middle of the next decade. since the trust fund can't borrow if the laws are changed medicare will be unable to pay full payments for charges in the age i trust fund. it will only be able to reimburse providers 85% of what they are charging. so clearly legislative action has to be made before that he either to raise taxes or slow the growth in spending or preferably a little bit of both. i my reckoning i have completed my assignment and rather than take a gold star as i said i want to have a couple of general observations. the first when we have discussiodiscussio ends like this we should make clear what our goal this. if our goal is to moderate the growth of medicare costs what cost are we talking about quicksilver talking about the federal government scots? are we talking about the federal government and beneficiaries cost or are we talking about federal government scots in the beneficiaries cost and the cost borne by states localities and private payers? in other words, when we talk about medicare for former cost savings you can reduce medicare programs federal cos
. now that's important. morality is made by law. you also have no dividing of any human being allowed. that is the key. why? because you go to any pagen area, the faeroe, the roman cesar come alexander the great. you have a fusion of religious and political power. that is the normal situation, the fusion. caesar was the chief priest and the emperor considered divine. they stood right in and they make it more intense. jesus up the morrill antito make the case for the radical monogamy, it doesn't allow for the divorce and christianity, no pity and a lifelong union of male and female, no divorce except under very particular circumstances. so the church was the overseer of this new morality. and when jesus said my kingdom is not of this world, then he made the split complete because that meant the king in the temporal rule within to be kept distinct from the church and that developed in the middle ages. you have i think the account between the church and state by the pope when at the end of the 400 but saying for the sake of both the church and the state to have to keep a distinct. what h
that we all have given through congress. i don't know what the law is spent we will make a request on that and appreciate your follow up on it. we go now to karen bass of california. >> thank you, mr. chair. i want to congratulate secretary kerry on your appointment, and also join my colleagues in expressing my condolences. >> thank you. >> i look forward to working with you, and especially working with the committed men and women at the state department. i have to tell you that i've really enjoyed working directly with the state department and i'm honored to have an excellent pearson fell in my office who i am looking forward to continuing to work with me. as the ranking member of the african subcommittee all wanted to share with you several priority issues i hope you will consider. first of all come u.s.-africa trade relations. number two, the importance of development assistance programs, including global hiv/aids funding through pepfar. number three, support for peacekeeping operations. as you know the u.n. is considering establishing a peacekeeping force and mali and there's a
don't have to pay, and diplomatic protections for the egregious violations of law. you can't take it to criminal court, but to the table to negotiate with those who tell you we're the only people, we, the jewish people, with rights in this land. these cold, hard realities of how u.s. policy grievancely harms palestinians are screened from the u.s. public. we bombarded, especially on television, instead, with dishonest rhetoric what is described as progress in a so-called peace process which extensively consistented of negotiations between near equals under the impartial gays of an honest american broker, all supposedly intended to create an independent palestinian state. i'm arguing that this is not what is actually happening. this is not what has happened for 35 years. what has happened is the continuation and the intensification and the reenforcement of the dispersal of the organization and colonization of the pal stippian people and their homeland. the united states, in fact, has never really operated as an honest broker between the palestinians and israel. i never talked to an
of retirement and health care benefits is consistent with what is required by the federal law of ups, federal express and every other almost every other corporation in the country it would be very similar. >> it could be different from what the private sector companies are doing. i would like to know, i would like to make that available to the postal employees that i represent throughout the country. >> you are correct but it's not the same for health care benefits. i will provide a more detailed record. >> you are saying the postal service now is operating at 140% of current revenue; is that the number you gave? >> drm laes, unfunded liabilities. >> bankruptcy would probably be where they are. >> finally let me go to something completely unrelated. you testified he wanted more flexibility in their rates in respect to packaging the monopoly on first-class they would have it facto monopoly on the third clause catalogs and what people would refer to as door hangers and nobody has the reach you do. how do you give that flexibility without giving you the power to do sweetheart deals and take the
. the first house vacant at the double what was a mother-in-law house. it was not inhabited. the person was away at the time and the flier mailed it. house was destroyed by the fire. and they got down to the compound, and began to do triage your getting things moved away from that blue house and the blue double wide so they wouldn't catch fire, putting a sprinkle on top of the house to give yourself a little edge. and this is what was coming. and one of the things that the captains, richard gerhart and freddie espinoza agreed upon is they would do a burnout. they would start a fire and run into the main fire. now, this is one of the most combustible places on the plan planet. and they couldn't get the backfire started. they hav had their trip george d they're trying to get it going. people see what was left of the original attempt at the backfire in just a second. but this caused some degree of anxiety. you have this thing pouring down on you and your want to run it by right into and if are you trying to start, and here's the guy trying to start it. isn't taking. it should just take off
the audience. please wait until you get a microphone before u.s. to because of laws we will pick you up on camera. u.s. a question? down here in front. you have to wait for the microphone. and copley's to do as a favor. not accusing you, don't make a speech. as the question. >> my question is whether their is a real parallel between the argument for abolishing slavery and the argument for abolishing war. >> sounds like that's yours. >> the question is, is there real parallel? i don't know. the point that i was trying to make was i think every generation does seven things and italy. we do things that make us more -- morally queasy, but we think we have to do them. i would say that for our generation as for pretty much every generation before us, war is one of those things. again, ask for a show of hands. how many people think the war is a good thing and have many people think that war should never be used as a policy? >> we are then obviously all conflicted. i think if you look back on previous generations, to think that we can't morally understand how honest, sincere people could believ
, under secretary norman went in and froze the the 1981 bill that became law, that the reagan tax cut we are talking about earlier so it was a practical handle. the neat thing that you recount again five years later it didn't make a difference. four or five years later by 1984 there were 40 other organizations doing knockoffs of what the mandate for leadership had been. >> when i interviewed the president of other think tanks in washington d.c. brookings and c s i s and kato, i said what difference has the heritage approach to research made? all the difference in the world. the brookings president said we now do what heritage first started so heritage really, and i say that in the book, change the think tank culture of washington d.c.. >> one of the neatest things that i can say among all of you, 25, 30 years ago when phil and i were just getting our feet wet at heritage there weren't 600 people in the united states who knew what a think tank was. 600,000 people have voluntarily supported us. that is incredible. incredible impact. >> glad you mentioned that because there is no other thin
rush. one came from massachusetts, from harvard and yale law school. so was an odd mix. one was a politician, businessman, double dealer, self-promoter, who became the first superintendent of yellowstone national park. the sent one, whose father had followed the gold rush, was a soldier, a humble cavalry lieutenant who is also a self-taught scientist, brilliant man, phenomenal writer, who wrote the first great account of the exploration of yellow stone in 1870 that was haled at the time by the leading scientist office the day as the greates writings sip lewis and clark, and the third was the harvard and yale law school bookish hype ocon dry yack scholar, who became like men in the west, driven by fear, for a of the others he walked from independence, iowa to the montana gold rush. acted the politician and future superintendent, and like a lot of white men who settled there, he became an exterminationist. i think about the conversation in the earlier panel about the problem for historians out presentism. how you impose the moral assumptions and values of the present on the re
and actually really happy to see how quickly law enforcement got on top of it and hold pulled it together so incredibly quickly and got the people apprehended them and they were captured in a matter of days. that actually made me feel so much more secure and so much better and i was really applauding the fbi and all the police that were working together and how everybody seemed to be reacting differently to those then 9/11. there was less feared and more rallying and they were not going to let them do this. on the other hand as my job i was watching the friends ask in the technology that they were using and i was fascinated. the infrared helicopters that they could watch the motions of the guy in the boat the fact that there was let in a sabha campus moving. i need to pick those things up for my writing and i know that sounds horrible but i'm listening as a human being and listening as a writer. i couldn't help the reality is that i thought it was fascinating and horrifying. >> having spent a number of years writing about a manhunt, i also found the tactics of this manhunt quite interesting.
in cleveland working for a law firm, and this next call comes from bobby in ohio. >> caller: i've got a question for you in regards to the comment you made about rg 3:and the article about him being called an uncle tom. why would you state that person saying that would be republican? wouldn't democrats actually sometimes have feelings like that? i'm a republican, and i don't feel that way towards rg iii, so i'm just curious why you would say that. >> guest: you either misunderstood what i said, or i said it badly. what i said was the espn guy criticized rg iii because he thought he was republican. he said there's a rumor he's republican, i don't know about that. he's got a white fiancee, i don't know about that. he called him a cornball brother because he suspected that rg iii was a republican, but he had a white fiancee. that is why this caster called him a cornball brother which i think is a racist thing. so i'm sorry if i misexplained it. >> host: go ahead, bobby, you're still on the line. >> caller: i appreciate that. i agree the same way you do then. i think it's totally a racist
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